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Wave Energy to power Desalination Plants in Western Australia

Wave Energy to power Desalination Plants in Western Australia

The Gillard Labor Government are set to invest revenue from the carbon price to support Western Australia’s Carnegie Wave Energy Limited in trialling a project utilising Wave Energy to power Desalination Plants.

This world-first project will use the power of ocean waves to directly drive high pressure desalination pumps at a pilot-scale desalination plant, substantially reducing emissions and electricity consumption.

Federal Minister for Industry and Innovation, Greg Combet, and Special Minister of State, Gary Gray, announced a grant of $1.27million from the Gillard Government’s Clean Technology Innovation Program to support the $2.5million project.

“Contrary to the hysteria from Tony Abbott, the Gillard Government and businesses are working together to invest in renewable energy projects that will cut carbon pollution and make Australia more competitive,” Mr Combet said.

“Carnegie Wave Energy’s innovative wave-energy project is an example of how Australian businesses are leading the way to cut power bills and prepare for a low carbon economy.”

The desalination plant will be co-located on Garden Island with the power station. The $31.2million power station is being supported by a $9.9million grant from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency.

Mr Gray congratulated Carnegie Wave Energy for another world leading project.

“Carnegie Wave Energy is already in partnership with the Gillard Government to supply power to HMAS Stirling through its Wave Energy Project at Garden Island and I am pleased we are expanding our partnership by supporting this desalination project,” said Mr Gray.

“The company will deploy its existing CETO technology to harness the power of waves off Garden Island to drive the desalination pumps on the Island to make sea water drinkable.

“This world-first process has the potential to reduce the electricity consumption of traditional desalination plants by up to 90 per cent.”

“These buoys move with the motion of passing waves, pressurising water that is delivered onshore to drive the hydraulic motor and pumping system for the desalination plants,” Mr Allen explained.

“Together, the wave powered power station and desalination plant on Garden Island will produce power and clean, drinkable water for the Navy. The Garden Island site will enable us to demonstrate the technology to organisations interested in developing wave powered power stations and desalination plants throughout the world.”

The Clean Technology Innovation Program funding will assist in the design and development of the seawater intake and brine discharge system; control instrumentation; and hydraulic system interface to enable integration with a traditional desalination facility.

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